Urban and Development Master Planning

Regenerating cities to better fit growing urban populations and evolving user needs and habits

Main Output

    National and Regional Transport Master Planning
    Sustainable Urban Mobility Planning (SUMP)
    Urban Paratransit Planning
    Urban Pedestrian and Bicycling Network Planning
    District Parking Plans
    Brownfield / Greenfield Regeneration Projects
    Transit Oriented Developments
    Sustainable Neighborhoods / District Planning
    Mixed-Use Real Estate Development Planning
    Evacuation Plans
    Transport Network Retrofitting Studies
    Equal Access Audit and Planning (social and gender equity)
    Universal Accessibility and Design-for-All Plans
    Safe Routes to School programs

How can we adopt a cyclical and adaptive planning process for achieving efficient, connected, smart and resilient urban system?

The concept of smart, resilient and adaptive cities blends the steps of the traditional planning process that previously followed a rigorous and lengthy sequence of events – planning, design, implementation, operation, testing, and validation – and creates an interdisciplinary process that generates iterative and cyclical systems of data extraction and adaptation in real time

Athens Waterfront Regeneration Master Plan, Public Transport Accessibility Level
Athens Waterfront Regeneration Master Plan, Public Transport Accessibility Level
Maine-Montparnasse Urban Regeneration, Spatial Analysis of Proposed Master Plan
Maine-Montparnasse Urban Regeneration, Spatial Analysis of Proposed Master Plan

We, as transport planners, need to implement a system that is able to adapt to everchanging challenges, conditions and needs to ensure that our cities and developments and time proofed and resistant. The creation of resilient cities through a smart and seamlessly connected mobility network and point solutions has the ability to optimize infrastructure, connect remote and distant areas, promote ‘sub-urbanism’ and transform the city into a responsive platform that adapts to different functions, habits, and demographic constituencies.

We, as transport planners, need to implement a system that is able to adapt to everchanging challenges, conditions and needs to ensure that our cities and developments and time proofed and resistant.

Charenton-Bercy Development, Isochronal Analysis
Charenton-Bercy Development, Isochronal Analysis

What is the role of Transportation Planning in Development Master Planning in Brownfield Regeneration and New Town planning?

Accessibility and transport are crucial factors to unlock the potential of any urban development; the possibility to arrive and move around easily, conveniently and efficiently is vital for the success of any project. A well-conceived, sustainable and integrated mobility strategy will ensure the provision of adequate network capacity and functionality to matching future mobility needs as well as creating high quality urban environments, by paying due regard to cityscape and streetscape elements.

MIND- Milan Innovation District, Isochronal Analysis via Public Transport
MIND- Milan Innovation District, Isochronal Analysis via Public Transport
AC Milan New Stadium Mobility Study, Isochronal Analysis via Public Transport
AC Milan New Stadium Mobility Study, Isochronal Analysis via Public Transport

Land use distribution and layout, road reconfiguration, public transport accessibility, effectiveness and functionality of access and parking strategy, servicing and delivery strategy, pedestrian environment quality, internal mobility, green links, open spaces and connectivity with key surrounding sites represent fundamental components for the success of new development projects. Development Transportation Plans are also supported by advanced multi modal macroscopic and microscopic traffic modelling for assessing the project impacts and the effectiveness of transport solutions and thus identify possible mitigation measures for all transport modes.

Can technology turn into a tool to increase the efficiency, multimodality and sustainability of transport network?

Intelligent mobility planning requires an innovative, well-rounded and multi-modal approach, in order to address both regional and local scales. Technological advancements allow for developing cognitive mobility systems aimed to optimize private traffic management schemes and public transport systems, establish efficient mobility sharing schemes, offer on-demand services, and regulate parking.

Moscow River Regeneration Plan, Spatial Analysis Showing Urban Connectivity
Moscow River Regeneration Plan, Spatial Analysis Showing Urban Connectivity
MIND- Milan Innovation District, Isochronal Analysis by Private Car
MIND- Milan Innovation District, Isochronal Analysis by Private Car

Modern transport systems are based on a comprehensive provision of intelligent mobility infrastructure, coupled with a large array of smart, green mobility services. This results in an increasingly shared approach to transportation with positive outcomes in the form of less traffic, improved environmental quality, and new business opportunities. Planning intelligent systems is also charged with providing time-proof technologies that are responsive and adaptive to possible disruptions and evolutions: like the driverless revolution, for instance, that will continue to pose questions regarding our toolkit and engineering principles.

How much adequately designed walkable networks contribute to the livability qualities of a Master Plan?

Walking is undoubtedly the most sustainable and convenient mode of transport for short distance trips at the urban scale and within mixed-use development master plans. A sound and reliable transport planning strategy considers pedestrians as the most important urban actors that will define the multi-fold pattern of mobility flows. Planning walkable cities and districts is a key for their success. The density of any development together with its mixed-use nature is complemented and completed by a walkable network that connects the different parts through a well-design and integrated public realm. Walkable neighborhoods are safe, healthy and eco-friendly places to live, work and play in. The value generated from walking people in a city or a neighborhood has proven success to on-street retail units, through activating the ground floor, providing vibrant places and mostly reduce usage of motorized modes of transportation for short trips.

Tashkent City Centre, Roads Redesign, Pedestrian Centralities Mapping
Tashkent City Centre, Roads Redesign, Pedestrian Centralities Mapping

Tools

Urban and Development Master Planning requires a set of specialized multi-scale tools adequate for verifying performance and design standards compliance.

Network Morphological Analysis is a useful tool for unveiling hidden qualities intrinsic to the city network by defining hierarchies and distinctions among the most connected, integrated, and/or central segments of the network.

Spatial Perception Analysis is used mainly to evaluate perceptive characteristics prescribed by the spatial characteristics often prescribing pedestrian movements in any given space.

Macroscopic (static) vehicle traffic modelling is used as a multi-modal demand forecasting tool and a performance measurement tool.

Pedestrian movement gravity modelling is used to determine pedestrian traffic distribution patterns and desire lines based on the travel times, distances and impedance attributed to every segment and node of the system.

Microscopic (dynamic) traffic modelling is used to validate the functioning levels of any proposed network and measure the effectiveness of interventions while highlighting any undesired congestion situation that might be generated.

Junction Performance Analytical tools are used to measure the overall performance at signalized and non-signalized junctions based on indicators such as the average and maximum delay, queue lengths, etc.

Road design tools are used to ensure compliance to local standards/ regulations and world-best-practice standards, ensuring proper dimensioning and required safety conditions.

References projects

       
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